Author Topic: Handgun Holds  (Read 229 times)

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Offline T191032

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Handgun Holds
« on: April 20, 2019, 10:57:09 PM »
In a recent post, there was some discussion about handgun hold.  I thought perhaps I would attempt to give some visual interpretations.  I've heard it said a picture is worth a thousand words, so I hope this will suffice to help.  I do not make the best of models, but you can get a pretty general impression from the pictures.

One-Hand Bullseye Style

Here you see the basic Bullseye hold, arm straight out, hand wrapped around the grip supporting it.  The opposite hand would typically be in the pocket, or tucked away in a position of balance, not being used during shooting.
It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline T191032

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2019, 10:58:53 PM »
Tea Cup

Here you see the basic Tea Cup hold, arms out, the opposite hand under the pistol supporting the dominant hand and weapon, as if "cupping" a tea cup.
It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline T191032

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2019, 11:01:15 PM »
Isosceles

Here you see the basic Isosceles hold, arms straight out. both hands wrapped around the grip supporting it.
It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline T191032

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2019, 11:04:34 PM »
Weaver

Here you see a basic Weaver hold, arm straight out, support arm bent, both hands wrapped around the grip supporting it.
It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline T191032

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2019, 11:06:15 PM »
Weaver

Here you see a basic Weaver hold, arm straight out, support arm bent, both hands wrapped around the grip supporting it.  In this variation, I've added the finger-forward positioning favored back in the 1980s.
It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline Hoosier Daddy

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2019, 04:27:29 PM »
Nice... Thanks for the detail!
1377, 1740, H9A, 1701P plus a whole lot more ;)

Offline mr007s

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2019, 04:59:28 PM »
You do know that you are holding it in the wrong hand, dont you?   :) :) :)

Offline BillK

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2019, 12:47:41 AM »
You do know that you are holding it in the wrong hand, dont you?   :) :) :)

 :D ;D.... ;)



Great pics & very helpful.  Seems most of the holds are for powder burners with a "kick" that needs to be controlled.  Us lucky air gunners can use almost any hold that get us on the target 10 ring.
Just have to also find a comfortable "stance" that works.  I would think that either PB or AG would use the same stance.  Not being a powder burner shooter I don't know this for sure.  And being a halfassed
air gunner I don't know a proper air gun stance for one hand or two hand shooting.
Any thoughts out there??? ???
« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 01:01:28 AM by BillK »
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Offline Multigunner

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2019, 02:50:51 AM »
A hold I've found useful for heavy air pistols is to bring the left hand over to lightly grasp the upper arm just above the elbow of the right arm then bring the right hand holding the pistol grip over and rest it on the upper left arm just above the elbow.
A variation would be to have the left fore arm along the outside of the right arm and cup the right elbow with a light grip. Thumb should be in the crook of the elbow.
If wearing a coat you can grasp the coat sleeve firmly instead of the arm.
practice to find which variation is the steadiest for you.

This puts the breech of the gun at about the same distance from the eye as a shoulder stock would.

You can either support the hand holding the pistol or adjust your grip on the right arm to allow you to rest a fore end just in front of the trigger guard. Second method may be better for long heavy pistols.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 02:56:00 AM by Multigunner »

Offline T191032

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2019, 04:02:44 AM »
You do know that you are holding it in the wrong hand, dont you?   :) :) :)

So I have been told.  :)

BillK,

You are correct in that "most of the holds are for powder burners with a "kick" that needs to be controlled."  I went with the 3576 to demo with because -
A. It is very ill fitting to my hand
B. Best demonstrates the "powder burning" crowd both double and single action trigger pull.

I left out a couple of pictures, such as the one I whimsically refer to as the "Seagal Stance", as it wasn't easy to see in the photograph.  Basically, it's a modified Weaver-sword stance.  Given my various physical "issues", it works fairly good for me.  The "Taco hold" and a few others just didn't enter into my mind at the time.


It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline KevinP

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2019, 03:30:50 AM »
Well .............  lets start with a given.... ( or two ) - well looks like more that that.
generally speaking *** for our purposes and come on not 1,000 yard shots ***
any gun, rifle etc...............

If the sights / sighting system are in perfect alignment when the
projectile leaves the barrel, you will hit what you are aiming at.

yes, even though recoil starts when the projectile starts moving.
The kick is when it leaves the barrel, if the sights are lined up properly
at that time, that is all that maters.

**** wherever the shot lands on the target, that is where the sights where lined up at the time the
projectile leaves the barrel.

Any grip that helps maintain the sight alignment till this point will work.

You can hold the gun upside down and hit the bulls eye, yes I have done it,
single action pulling trigger with my pinky.

Perhaps you have seen the over the shoulder using a mirror trick.
EASY - align the sights, pull trigger with your thumb. yes I have done it....

All you need is a firm grip. The only thing moving should be your trigger finger.
With these airguns we don't have to tame the recoil ( there is none ) * generally speaking *

So just be comfortable , let your finger do the work and enjoy....

Yes there is a lot more involved but the basics is all that is needed for us.


It really is easy once you understand.  :-*







« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 03:39:54 AM by KevinP »
Kevin
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Offline T191032

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2019, 03:18:21 AM »
KevinP,

"**** wherever the shot lands on the target, that is where the sights where lined up at the time the
projectile leaves the barrel."

That's why my shooting is always an adventure!

I was trying to be "general" in my responses.  LOL
It ain't like it used to be but, eh, it's do.

Offline KevinP

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2019, 04:14:31 PM »
KevinP,

"**** wherever the shot lands on the target, that is where the sights where lined up at the time the
projectile leaves the barrel."

That's why my shooting is always an adventure!

I was trying to be "general" in my responses.  LOL

 :D  as it should be ....   8) :-*
Kevin
Albany, New York

Offline Multigunner

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2019, 07:27:34 AM »
Line of sight is seldom parallel to the line of the bore. Even if there were zero recoil or muzzle jump the two lines must intersect at some point down range.
Also there are usually two points of intersection, one as the projectile is on its relatively upwards journey and one at its maximum sighted in range.
The muzzle being elevated to compensate for drop. The projectile is actually dropping relative to the bore line the moment it leaves the muzzle.

if sighted for extremely short range , with projectile intersecting line of sight first at the point of aim the point of impact could be a bit higher further out then begin to drop relative to line of sight after it passes the highest point in its trajectory. Further on it intersects line of sight again for the last time.

Its possible with a very low height of sight and a low velocity to have only a single short range intersection, with projectile beginning to drop at that point..
« Last Edit: April 26, 2019, 07:30:12 AM by Multigunner »

Offline KevinP

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Re: Handgun Holds
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2019, 04:57:04 PM »
No argument to that fact here ...............
but as I said
 .....  generally speaking *** for our purposes .............. :-*
« Last Edit: April 26, 2019, 04:59:06 PM by KevinP »
Kevin
Albany, New York